Sherwood Animal Clinic
Two Sheep Horses Dog Taking Another Dog For A Walk Girl and Kitten Row of Cattle Sleepy Kittens

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VET TIPS

Vaccination Protocols

Three Small Kittens

CATS & DOGS

These vaccination protocols are standardized. For a protocol that is customized for your specific pet’s needs, please consult one of our veterinarians.

Puppy and kitten

Congratulations on your new puppy or kitten! Now that you have the exciting new bundle of joy home and settled in there are a few dates to mark on your calendar. Let us help you keep your new pet safe!

  • 8 weeks old – time for your 1st vaccine and deworming! Often this vaccine will have been given by the breeder.
  • 12 weeks old – 2nd vaccine and deworming. This is a booster and is very important to ensure a good immune response.
  • 16 weeks old – 3rd and final puppy/kitten vaccine, rabies and deworming. This is your last booster, but this time your pet will receive a rabies vaccine as well.

Cats and dogs

Adult cats and dogs should receive annual check up’s and vaccines.

Brown Horse

HORSES

These vaccination protocols are standardized. For a protocol that is customized for your specific herd needs, please consult one of our veterinarians.

Foals

  • 6 months old – first vaccinations (EEE, WEE, tetanus, WNV, rhino/flu)
  • 7 months old – booster
  • 10 months old – rabies

Horses

  • Core vaccines – EEE, WEE, tetanus, WNV, rabies
  • Additional vaccines – rhino/flu, strangles

CATTLE

These vaccination protocols are standardized. For a protocol that is customized for your specific herd needs, please consult one of our veterinarians.

Calves

Spring (prior to turnout)

  • IBR, BVD, PI3, BRSV
  • Clostridial 6 or 8-way
  • Mannheimia hemolytica

Fall (weaning)

  • Booster IBR, BVD, PI3, BRSV
  • Booster Clostridial 6 or 8-way
  • Booster Mannheimia hemolytica
  • Vaccinate for H. somnus

Cows and heifers

Annual pre-breeding (spring) vaccines

  • IBR, BVD, PI3, BRSV

Bulls

Annual pre-breeding (spring) vaccines

  • IBR, BVD, PI3, BRSV
  • Foot Rot

SHEEP & GOATS

These vaccination protocols are standardized. For a protocol that is customized for your specific herd needs, please consult one of our veterinarians.

Lambs and kids

  • 8 weeks old – give first 8-way Clostridial with tetanus vaccine
  • 12 weeks old – booster 8-way Clostridial with tetanus vaccine, rabies

Sheep and goats

  • Annual 8-way Clostridial vaccine, rabies
  • Optional Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis vaccine

Tick Prevention

Ticks are more than just creepy crawly inconveniences on our pets. They also can carry and transport diseases. During the spring and summer months, ticks are most often found in areas with tall grass. Check your pet regularly for ticks. Some of their favorite places to hide are around the ears, armpits and groin. Ask your veterinarian about prescription tick preventatives for your pet.

Heartworm Prevention

Heartworm is parasite that can affect dogs of all ages. The worm is carried and transmitted by mosquitoes. When an infected mosquito bites a dog, it transmits the parasite into the dog’s bloodstream. The parasites then migrate to the dog’s heart, where they grow and mature, eventually causing cardiac disease in the host dog.

Prevention is key! Heart worm is easy to prevent, but rather taxing to treat. While Saskatchewan has only ever been considered a low risk area for heartworm, this parasite is gradually coming our way. Ask your veterinarian about heartworm tests and preventative measures for your dog.

Pet and Equine Identification

There are lots of ways to ensure your dog, cat or horse can be identified should they happen to find themselves lost in unfamiliar territory. Your dogs and cats should wear their city licenses as well as their most current rabies vaccine tags. These tags can be traced back to the correct owners through the veterinary clinic that dispensed the tag. Tattoos are also a popular method of identification for cats, dogs and horses and can be traced through the vet clinic or association that administered them. Microchips are also an effective way to ensure your pet is always “carrying their I.D.” These are small chips that are inserted under the skin and can be read with a scanner. The scanner reveals the microchip’s identification number and links us to the owner’s contact information.